Water is Life – For Flint

The top of a water tower at the Flint Water Plant is seen in Flint, Michigan

The top of a water tower at the Flint Water Plant is seen in Flint, Michigan January 13, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook

This Wednesday, February 10, 2016 from 5:30 – 11:00am EST, Classical  Discoveries presents:

Water is Life – For Flint – WPRB Radio Broadcast

As I was flipping through images for a possible Valentine special knowing that most likely everyone will focus on same subject, I stumbled on a picture that caused me to change my focus.

It was a picture of thick, almost brown compressed water coming out of a faucet in Flint MI, forming a thick residue in the shape resembling a heart – yes, in the shape of a heart.
flint-water-top-compressed

At this point, I knew that my Valentine special would be different and would be about water and how this most important source of our life inspired so many composers.

It will be a radio tribute to the people of Flint and to all others who have had their life destroyed because of fracking, oil and sludge spills and other environmental disasters caused by humans.
Water is of major importance to all living things; in some organisms, up to 90% of their body weight comes from water and up to 60% of the human adult body is made of water.
My heart goes out to the people of Flint and I am outraged that elected officials knowingly deprived a whole town of basic clean water in the name of the almighty dollar and possibly damaging them for life.
My heart goes out especially to children whose life may be ruined due to this horrific event. The lack of action to solve this problem by the people that caused this horrific crime is inexcusable and criminal! All involved should be prosecuted!

This is why this week’s Classical Discoveries special is called “Water is Life – For Flint” The show will be totally devoted to works inspired by different forms of water.
I know that this will not help Flint but I just want to remind people that it is very easy to pollute and destroy a life on our planet.

Here is a list of some of the works to be presented this Wednesday:
Become Ocean by American composer John Luther Adams (1953- )
In Hydraulis
by Franco-Flemish composer Antoine Busnoys (c.1430-1492)
Les Fleuves engloutis pour orchestre (The Rivers Engulfed, for orchestra)
by Franco-Lebanese composer Bechara EL-Khoury (1957- )
Four Pieces About Water
(Running Water, Salt Water, Frozen Water, Rain Water) by Canadian composer Emily Doolittle (1972- )
Symphony No. 63 “Loon Lake” by American composer Alan Hovhaness (1911-2000)
Water Music by American composer Libby Larsen (1950- )
Hafis (Drift Ice) Op. 63 by Icelandic composer Jón Leifs (1899-1968)
Living Waters by American composer Peter Lieuwen (1953- )
Dark Waters by American composery Ingram Marshall (1942-)
I Hear The Water Dreaming by Japanese composer Toru Takemitsu (1930-1996)
Future of Water by Australian composer Julian Yu (1957- )
Like Streams in the Desert by American composer Meira Warshauer (1949- )
as well works by composers: Douglas Knehans, Karen Tanaka, Lois V Vierk
and more works inspired by water

You can listen to the program on the radio in NJ, parts of PA, Delaware and NY at: WPRB 103.3FM Princeton NJ, or on the Internet at: http://www.wprb.com/

For Internet listeners link to excellent Time Zone Converter: http://www.timezoneconverter.com/cgi-bin/tzc.tzc
If you are on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/1556090024704481/

Please check the Classical Discoveries website a few days before the event for more details at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/
After the broadcast MP3 file will be available for limited time at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/index_02_10_2016_temporary_file.html

Water (chemical formula: H2O) is a transparent fluid which forms the world’s streams, lakes, oceans and rain, and is the major constituent of the fluids of organisms. Water is a liquid at standard ambient temperature and pressure, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice; and gaseous state, steam (water vapor). It also exists as snow, fog, dew and cloud.Water covers 71% of the Earth’s surface. It is vital for all known forms of life. Safe drinking water is essential to humans and other life forms even though it provides no calories or organic nutrient (per Wikipedia)http-_www.tangentcompany.com_world-water-day-celebrate-learn-share_

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The summer on Classical Discoveries

It has been quite awhile since I wrote my last blog. I had big plans to write a few more, but the end of the school year has been quite crazy. I also had a piano recital last Sunday, which kept me busy.

The summer schedule was announced a bit late. I hope you did not miss last Monday’s early music special.

So this is how the schedule goes.

Classical Discoveries will air each Wednesday from 5:30 till 11:00am, followed by the Avant-Garde Edition until 1:00pm.

On five Mondays during June and July I will present 5 special musical travelogues.

These programs, as presented in earlier years, will focus on different countries and regions of the globe.

Each show will start at 5:30am and end at 11:00am

Schedule for:

CLASSICAL DISCOVERIES AROUND THE WORLD SUMMER TRAVELS

  • Monday, June 13, 2011 – 5:30 – 11:00 AM – POLAND  – FROM THE BALTIC SEA TO THE TATRA MOUNTAINS
  • Monday, June 27, 2011 – 5:30 – 11:00 AM – LATVIA – FROM RIGA WITH LOVE – with special guest, young Latvian composer Eriks Esenvalds, who is visiting the USA for the première of his music with Philadelphia Crossing. His works were broadcast for the first time in USA on Classical Discoveries
  • Monday, July 04, 2011 – 5:30  – 11:00 AM – USA – AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL – July 4th Special  – annual American music show
  • Monday, July 11, 2011 – 5:30 – 11:00 AM –  CANADA – “UP NORTH” – CANADA REVISITED
  • Monday, July 25, 2011 – 5:30 – 11:00 AM – UKRAINE – FRESCOES OF KIEV

Details about each program will be announced closer to the broadcast date and I might blog some extra information if time allows me.

For Early Music Lovers

TREASURES OF EARLY MUSIC  –  Program devoted to little known repertoire before 1750 is back for 3 summer specials.

Unfortunately the first was already aired last Monday, but you can check the playlist to find out what you missed

  • Monday, June 06, 2011 – 8:30 – 11:00 AM  – Playlist for 06-06-2011
  • Monday, June 20, 2011 – 8:30 – 11:00 AM
  • Monday, July  18, 2011 – 8:30 – 11:00 AM

Highlights will be posted on the Classical Discoveries website as well as on Facebook a couple of days before each program.

The last special at the end of the summer at WPRB will be:

24-HOUR LIVE WPRB RADIO BROADCAST – MARATHON  – WE REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11

Starting SATURDAY, September 10, 2011 – 7:00 PM through SUNDAY, September 11, 2011 – 7:00 PM

At the 10th anniversary of September 11, Classical Discoveries will present a 24-hour live radio marathon, totally devoted to music written by composers from many countries as a reaction to the unforgettable events of that day.

I will write more about the Marathon shortly. You can check Sequenza 21 – May 21, 2011 – Call for recorded music written to commemorate 9/11 tragedy
Posted by Steve Layton

I am planning to have some composer guests as I do each summer. Since I do not have confirmation with the exception of  Ēriks Ešenvalds, these will be announced later.

 

Sacred Bridges

I love all kinds of holidays, civic and religious. Somehow this is one of few things in today’s world that reminds me who I am and from where I came from.

Maybe the fact that I am Jewish and married to a Catholic woman makes my thinking easier. One thing I have learnt from my relationship is that except for some different traditions we are very sentimental about, there is not much difference between our beliefs.

I rather call myself an open-minded spiritual man that is always searching for the similarity between religions rather than differences. I apply these similar feelings to all kinds of music. For example, I do not see a Renaissance mass as religious church music even if it was created for a church, but rather as a spiritual expression of the composer.

The concept of Sacred Bridges was rather accidental. No question that the Cd titled “Sacred Bridges” with the Kings Singers and Sarband was an inspiration, as well as my favorite monarch in medieval history – the 13th century king Alfonso the X called El Sabio.

Since the Christian and Jewish Holidays are often celebrated close to each other I was faced with the dilemma as to which holiday I should give my attention. The annual March series “In Praise of Woman” made the situation worse since the holidays often fall in March. For sometime now, additional show times are, in addition, not available for these special programs on WPRB.  The concept of the program celebrating the spiritual music of many religions was born three years ago.

Last year the main features of the program was  “The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach” by Vladimir  Ivanoff.  This year the beautiful “Messe de Requiem” by the little known French Composer, Alfred Desenclos (1912-1971) will be included.  This little known work was a victim of plagiarism, which you can read about by clicking the link below.

http://www.requiemsurvey.org/composers.php?id=256


For idea what you can expect if you tune into this program see prior programs:

03/30/2010

Alfonso X, El Sabio – Cantiga No. 76

Massaino, Tirburtio – Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet

King David – Song of Exile, Psalm 137, Verses 1 thru 6  Anon.

Devotional Sufi Song  – “Ya Hou Ya man Hou”

Caceres, Avraham  -“Hiski Hizki”

Harrison, Lou – Easter Cantata

Wronowicz, Maciej – De Profundis

Hersant, Philippe   – Le Chemin de Jerusalem (2003)

Hovhaness, Alan  – Shepherd of Israel (Last Section)

Hovhaness, Alan – Jesus Christ is Risen Today, Op. 100, No. 3b (from Easter Cantata)

Marcello, Benedetto  – Psalm X “In te Domino confido”

Anonymous Middle Ages  – Gregorian Alleluia and improvization on sitar

Cohen, Egon – Stabat Mater (2006)

Anon. Sephardic – Morena me llaman

Nasco, Giovanni  – Lectio Prima: “Da lamentatione Hieremiae prophetae”

Satoh, Somei  – Homa

Skempton, Howard – How Sits this City” from Lamentations (2001)

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski)/Claude Goudimel – Psalm 5

Anon. Sephardic – Ea Judios

Silvestrov, Valentin – Psalm 150 from “Two Psalms of David” (2007)

Hamburg, Jeff – Psalm 29 and Psalm 150 from David – Five Psalms (1999)

Buddhist Chant, arr. Jean-Philippe Rykiel  – Hope for Enlightment

Avni, Tzvi  – Psalm 150 from “Mizmorei Tehillim”

Jenkins, Karl  – “Are You Lost Out of Darkness?” from “Stabat Mater” (2008)

Anon. Religious Easter song from Provence – Lei planchs de nostra-Dama

Ivanoff, Vladimir  – The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach (USA Premiere broadcasts)

Poleva, Victoria – “David’s Psalm 50” (2001)

Von Bingen, Hildegard – O Splendissima gemma

Machajdik, Peter – Namah (2000)

Fanshawe, David – Crucifixus: Rain Song from “African Sanctus”

04/07/2009

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski) – Genevan Psalter, Psalm 6

Binder, Abraham Wolf – Two Hassidic Moods

Escobar, Pedro de – Stabat mater

Rahbari, Alexander – Persian Mysticism around G

Alfonso X el Sabio – Cantiga #292

Handel-Gallus, Jacobus – Lamentation 1

Horvit, Michael – Aleinu (Adoration) for Violin, Baritone, Choir and Organ

Williams, Julius- Meditation from the Easter Celebration

La Rue, Pierre de – Lesson 1 from Lamentations of Jeremiah

Waclaw of Szamotul – Psalm 85

Muzafar (17th Century Turkish court) – Bashraf zenjir husseyni

Caceres, Avraham – Cantata Le El Elim (To the God of Gods)

Gubrou, Tsegue Maryam – Golgotha

Al-Ansari, Ali Zakaria – Tranquil Moment

Pamintuan, John August – Crucifixus

Attributed to Emperor Leo the 6th – Hymn to the Virgin at the Foot of the Cross

Warshauer, Meira – Bracha

Lukaszewski, Pawel – Recordationes de Christo moriendo for Soprano and Strings

Ben-Amots, Ofer- Psalm 137

Arcadelt, Jacob – Lamentations

Sidiq, Mohammad Othman – Memoirs

 

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