Viva 21st Century Music

In late November of 2003, when I piled up CD’s for my WPRB winter break specials, the idea of a new program with music from the 21st century started to take shape. I did not have many new music recordings for my first program, but managed to mix the ones I had with some of my favorite earlier selections.

Flute - Courtesy: Azerbaijani Artist Namig Mammadov at: AZgallery.org

The end of the 20th century was very disappointing to me for various reasons. At that time I stopped listening to classical radio and going to live concerts with a few exceptions. Heavily advertised musical tributes to 20th century music presented mainly 80-90 year old warhorses. There is so much more to music of that period.

How I dreamed to hear  performances of symphonies by Henry Cowell, Harrison, Hovhaness and other American composers, live in the Academy of Music with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Not even one of them was represented in those tributes, nor as I recall any woman composer. It was like the clock stopped  after the 1st half of the 20th century.

My second program was 100 percent devoted to new music, but I had never imagined that 9 years later I would be able to present a continuous 24-hour program of 21st century music. I actually could do at least 4-5 more marathons, judging from the piles I am looking at right now.  I will take a rain check on those however!

Marathons?  It is all Jon’s fault. I am referring to Jon Solomon – WPRB legend, and veteran of the Christmas Marathons, of which this year will be his 24th.

When in 2007 I realized that my 5 plus hours would not let me present all of what I wanted, I looked  to Jon for inspiration and decided to give it a try. Here I am 4 years later getting ready for my 5th Winter Marathon joining the ranks of radio broadcaster junkies.

I must admit, that all suggestions on how to survive 24 hours on the air I received from Jon.  One more thing I do is that I treat myself to acupuncture a few hours before the Marathon. The hardest thing for me is to keep off bread for 24 hours!!  I love a good loaf of sour dough!!!

If you are curious, I never nap during the time I am on the air so, if anyone wants to call me when the music is playing please do so at 609-258-1033. I will need the support of my audience and friends, especially during late at night and the early morning hours when I will be totally alone. Also, if you are in the neighborhood, please visit me. The more action in the studio I have, the easier it will be for me to survive the 24 hours of madness.

This 9th Annual program is the 5th, 24-Hour Marathon totally devoted to new music composed in the 21st century. It will start on:

Monday, December 26, 2011 at 1:00pm and will end: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 at 1:00pm

 

In a few days you will find some featured composers listed on the home page of the Classical Discoveries website at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/  and on the Facebook Event Page at: https://www.facebook.com/events/124098904372882/

VIVA 21ST CENTURY – INTERNATIONAL EDITION  – 24-HOUR LIVE WPRB RADIO BROADCAST

The program will air on WPRB 103.3 FM Princeton and on the Internet around the world at:
http://www.wprb.com/listen.php
http://listen.wprb.com/pls
http://listen.wprb.com/ram
http://listen.wprb.com/asx

For Internet listeners link to excellent Time Zone Converter: http://www.timezoneconverter.com/cgi-bin/tzc.tzc

Other 24-hour new music Marathons

12-27/28-2009 – 24-hour Marathon – WOMEN COMPOSERS EDITION
09-08/09-2009 – 24-hour Marathon – AMERICAN EDITION
12-26/27-2008 – 24-hour Marathon – INTERNATIONAL EDITION
12-27/28-2007 – 24-hour Marathon – INTERNATIONAL EDITION

I hope that you can catch at least part of the WPRB Marathon madness.

Viva 21st Century, Viva New Music, and Viva Living Composers!!!

 

 

WE REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11

NY Firemen

It is incredible how certain events in life can put an imprint on the brain so that you can remember them for years to come.

I do remember the moment in WPRB at 10 am, September 11, 2001 when I received a phone call  from my wife telling me what was happening.

Since no emergency broadcast system was working and no phone calls went through until her phone call, I had been totally unaware what was happening.

I faced the most difficult moment in my life trying to finish the last hour of my show. It was so ironical that my program was that day titled East Meets West, and intended to promote peace and the mutual understanding of music from different cultures.

It was even more difficult for me since my cousin’s husband worked for Cantor Fitzgerald. Later that day, to my relief, I found out that he was away on a business trip and was not in New York.

Back at home I was not able to do anything. Glued to the the television with tears in my eyes and chills going through my bones, I was overwhelmed with grief and hoping to hear about survivors.

Two days later, during my 5-hour musical tribute to the fallen, I shut the music off in the studio when it was playing because I would have cried on the air.

I selected the saddest and most tragic music I could find to match my feelings, like Giya Kancheli’s “Mourned By the Wind”, Jón Leifs  Requiem, Wojciech Kilar’s  Requiem Father Kolbe, which I coincidently presented 4 years earlier on my first Classical Discoveries program.  I received many phone calls at that time asking about that incredible work.

After that, four special tributes followed with a special 5th anniversary program, totally devoted to works written from 2001 till 2006 in memory of the victims of 9/11.

Kilar - September Symphony

Since the fifth anniversary of 9/11, I have aired many new works written in memory of the victims.

Robert Moran’s Trinity Requiem received its world première broadcast just a couple of weeks ago and written for the famous Trinity Church which survived despite all the collapsed buildings around it.

The idea of a 24-hour 9/11 Marathon came to my head when I started a series of New Music marathons of 21st century music a few years ago.

Elodie Lauten - S.O.S.W.T.C

Originally I intended to invite different people for talk between the music. I later decided that the best way to speak is through the musical language of composers, since each has a personal story behind their music.

This tragedy inspired more composers than any other historical event in our history. Most people on Earth could see the events of that day unfolding in front of their eyes, making it more difficult to forget.

Joseph Schwantner

During the 24 hours of the Marathon you will hear many works submitted by composers specifically for this event.  I want to thank Sequenza 21 and International Alliance for Women Composers as well as other websites who supported this call for recordings.

During the marathon there will be some works being broadcast for the first time as well many works presented on my program before such as the September Symphony by Wojciech Kilar that I presented for the first time in June, 2004, Elodie Lauten’s complete electronic work S.O.S.W.T.C., and Stephen Hartke’s Symphony No. 3 just to mention a few as well as an encore presentation of Robert Moran’s Trinity Requiem.

Moran - Trinity Requiem

I know that this event will be a very difficult for me and every one else, but I do not know any other way I could commemorate this tragic happening, but with music.

If you are on Facebook, you can sign on the special Marathon Event Page – WE REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11

Closer to the Marathon you will find more information on the home page of the Classical Discoveries website.

CLASSICAL DISCOVERIES 24 – HOUR  MARATHON

WE REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11

starts: 
SATURDAY, September 10, 2011 – 7:00 PM

ends: 
 SUNDAY, September 11, 2011 – 7:00 PM

on WPRB 103.3FM Princeton and on Internet at:

http://listen.wprb.com/pls

http://listen.wprb.com/ram

http://listen.wprb.com/asx

http://www.wprb.com/listen.php

For those who are curious what I did before here is a playlist from the 5th Anniversary broadcast

  • ”IN MEMORIUM OF THE VICTIMS OF 9/11”

Margaret Brouwer (USA) –  – Lament
Craig Armstrong (USA) – World Trade Center Cello Theme from the Oliver Stone Film “World Trade Center
Robert Sirota (USA) – Triptych
Alla Pavlova (Russia/USA) – “Lullaby for the Twins” from “Old New York Nostalgia”
Charles Camilleri (Malta) – Dirge 11.09.01
Lee McQuillan (USA) – Romanza for Violin and Orchestra, “Into Troubled Times” (A 9/11 Reflection)
Robert Allworth (Australia) – “Saint John Fisher” from “Organ Preludes for Saints and Martyrs”
Stefania De Kenessey (USA) Autumn Elegy
Joseph Schwantner (USA) – September Canticle
Eric Ewazen (USA) – A Hymn for the Lost and the Living
Carl Schroeder (USA) – Christine’s Lullaby
Nancy Bloomer Deussen (USA) – “Et in Terra Pax”
Craig Armstrong – “Elegy” from the Oliver Stone Film, “World Trade Center”
Stephen Chatman (Canada) – Over Thorns to Stars
Carson P. Cooman (USA) – Canticle: Mosaic in Remembrance and Hope
Tyler Goodrich White (USA) – Elegy for the Orphans of Terror
Adolphus Hailstork (USA) – As Falling Leaves
Piotr Grella-Mozejko (Poland/Canada) – Lachrymae (In Memory of September 11, 2001)

Robert Ian Winstin (USA) – September 11, 2001 – 9:05 am
Wojciech Kilar (Poland) – September Symphony

Elodie Lauten (France/USA) – Selections from S.O.S.W.T.C.
Lera Auerbach (Russia) – Sonata No. 2 for Violin and Piano (Sept. 11)
Stephen Hartke (USA) – Symphony No. 3
Craig Armstrong – “Ethereal” from the Oliver Stone Film, “World Trade Center”

  • Playlist from the first memorial on 09/13/2001 –  “MUSIC OF MOURNING”

J.S. Bach – “Preludium” from Cello suite in D minor
Heinrich Ignaz Franz Von Biber – Requiem
Charles Camilleri – Requiem
Arnold Rosner – Five Meditations
John Dowland – Flow My Tears
Alan Hovhaness – Psalm and Fugue
Arvo Part – De Profundis
Wojciech Kilar – “Dona nobis pacem” from “Missa pro pace”
A. Scarlatti – Concerto #2 in C minor

D. Scarlatti – Sonata in B minor, L. 33.
Serge Kaufmann – Yiddish Suite
Peteris Vasks – Cantabile
Anon. 15th Century – Prayer
Maurice Durufle – Requiem
Wojciech Kilar – Requiem Father Kolbe
Claudio Monteverdi – Lamento D’Arianna
Vangelis Petsalis – Adagio for Strings
Zbigniew Preisner – “Lacrimosa” from “Requiem for my Friend”
Frantisek Tuma – Stabat Mater
Robert Starer – Elegy for a Woman Who Died Too Young
Giya Kancheli – “Mourned By the Wind”, Liturgy for viola and orchestra
Jon  Leifs – Requiem

  • Links to other tributes on “Classical Discoveries”

IN MEMORIUM OF THE VICTIMS OF 9/11 – 09-06-2006

WE REMEMBER – 09/11 MEMORIAL – 09-10-2004

MADE IN THE USA – 09/11 MEMORIAL – 09-10-2003

REMEMBERING THE VICTIMS OF TERRORISM AND WAR – 09-11-2002

MUSIC OF MOURNING – 09-13-2001

 

Fourteen years already, where did the time go?

The  Classical Discoveries  home page motto is:

“Host and producer Marvin Rosen celebrates new music and living composers all year-long, on the air since May 1997”

The months of May and June are always memorable for me at the time when WPRB shifts into the summer schedule.  This is when, in 1997, I presented my first Classical Discoveries broadcasts.  The Avant-Garde Edition became a regular weekly program in the summer of 2008.

The best way to celebrate this is with music of course – especially with new music  composed from the time Classical Discoveries went on the air.  I am going celebrate my 14th radio anniversary with a trio of programs with music I love – New Music, Music by American Composers as well as music from the Baltic Region.

  • Monday, June 27, 2011 – 5:30 – 11:00 AM – LATVIA – FROM RIGA WITH LOVE – 2nd  show from Classical  Discoveries Around the World  Summer Travels Series, with special Latvian guest at 8:30.

Riga. View from St Peters Church

View of Riga

Ēriks Ešenvalds - photo by Aivars Krastiņš

I am very excited about this special that will be crowned by the visit of the very talented, young (born in 1977) Latvian composer Eriks Esenvalds, who is known mainly for his choral works but  has written other works including the opera “Joseph Is a Fruitful Bough” (2007).  He is in the USA for a world première of his music by the Philadelphia Chamber Choir “The Crossing.”  Despite his young age, he has received many awards and has had his music performed in many countries around the world.

I am proud to say that his works were broadcast for the first time in the USA on Classical Discoveries.

The other composers that you can expect to hear on the first part of Monday’s program are: Rihards Dubra, Maija Einfelde, Janis Ivanovs, Imants Kalniņš, Juris Karlsons, Arturs Maskats, Georgs Pelecis, Pēteris Vasks, Jāzeps Vītols and Imants Zemzaris plus others.

  • Wednesday, June 29, 2011 from 5:30am till 1:00pm

7½ Hours Around the World.

Last year, on June 02, 2010 on a combined edition of both programs, I celebrated the 13th Anniversary of “Classical Discoveries” with a special: 11½ Hours Around the World. 

This year again,  7½ Hours Around the World.

I will present only music written in the last 14 years – the length of time “Classical Discoveries” has been on the air.

And here again, I am trying to prove that we do not have to be scared of new music and that there is so much exciting and wonderful music being written today. There will be some known names for listeners of my show and some totally unknown ones as well.  Included will be music by Robert Aldridge, Eric Biddington, Sylvia Bodorova, Ross Edwards, Gareth Farr, Giya Kancheli, Victoria Poleva, Somei Satoh, Valentin Silvestrov and many more.

 

 

  • Monday, July 04, 2011 – 5:30  – 11:00 AMUSAAMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL 15th July Fourth Special.

For the last 14 years I have presented one of 2 programs: Viva America – devoted to all American Composers or America the Beautiful – devoted to music describing USA landmarks.

Many composers have been inspired by the wonders and beauty of our country and that will be our theme this year when we travel this time just around the USA.

What can you expect from this special? You will definitely not hear Antonin Dvorak’s America inspired works and  will leave these for other stations.

You will instead hear works by, for example, Nancy Bloomer Deussen, Carson Cooman, Michael Daugherty, Don Gillis, Alan Hovhaness, Michael Mauldin, just to name some.

I hope that you can listen to at least some of these specials. Please check my website for more information closer to the broadcasts as well as Facebook.  It should be a very exciting trilogy. This is definitely a great way to celebrate the beginning of my fifteenth year on the air.



 

Sacred Bridges

I love all kinds of holidays, civic and religious. Somehow this is one of few things in today’s world that reminds me who I am and from where I came from.

Maybe the fact that I am Jewish and married to a Catholic woman makes my thinking easier. One thing I have learnt from my relationship is that except for some different traditions we are very sentimental about, there is not much difference between our beliefs.

I rather call myself an open-minded spiritual man that is always searching for the similarity between religions rather than differences. I apply these similar feelings to all kinds of music. For example, I do not see a Renaissance mass as religious church music even if it was created for a church, but rather as a spiritual expression of the composer.

The concept of Sacred Bridges was rather accidental. No question that the Cd titled “Sacred Bridges” with the Kings Singers and Sarband was an inspiration, as well as my favorite monarch in medieval history – the 13th century king Alfonso the X called El Sabio.

Since the Christian and Jewish Holidays are often celebrated close to each other I was faced with the dilemma as to which holiday I should give my attention. The annual March series “In Praise of Woman” made the situation worse since the holidays often fall in March. For sometime now, additional show times are, in addition, not available for these special programs on WPRB.  The concept of the program celebrating the spiritual music of many religions was born three years ago.

Last year the main features of the program was  “The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach” by Vladimir  Ivanoff.  This year the beautiful “Messe de Requiem” by the little known French Composer, Alfred Desenclos (1912-1971) will be included.  This little known work was a victim of plagiarism, which you can read about by clicking the link below.

http://www.requiemsurvey.org/composers.php?id=256


For idea what you can expect if you tune into this program see prior programs:

03/30/2010

Alfonso X, El Sabio – Cantiga No. 76

Massaino, Tirburtio – Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet

King David – Song of Exile, Psalm 137, Verses 1 thru 6  Anon.

Devotional Sufi Song  – “Ya Hou Ya man Hou”

Caceres, Avraham  -“Hiski Hizki”

Harrison, Lou – Easter Cantata

Wronowicz, Maciej – De Profundis

Hersant, Philippe   – Le Chemin de Jerusalem (2003)

Hovhaness, Alan  – Shepherd of Israel (Last Section)

Hovhaness, Alan – Jesus Christ is Risen Today, Op. 100, No. 3b (from Easter Cantata)

Marcello, Benedetto  – Psalm X “In te Domino confido”

Anonymous Middle Ages  – Gregorian Alleluia and improvization on sitar

Cohen, Egon – Stabat Mater (2006)

Anon. Sephardic – Morena me llaman

Nasco, Giovanni  – Lectio Prima: “Da lamentatione Hieremiae prophetae”

Satoh, Somei  – Homa

Skempton, Howard – How Sits this City” from Lamentations (2001)

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski)/Claude Goudimel – Psalm 5

Anon. Sephardic – Ea Judios

Silvestrov, Valentin – Psalm 150 from “Two Psalms of David” (2007)

Hamburg, Jeff – Psalm 29 and Psalm 150 from David – Five Psalms (1999)

Buddhist Chant, arr. Jean-Philippe Rykiel  – Hope for Enlightment

Avni, Tzvi  – Psalm 150 from “Mizmorei Tehillim”

Jenkins, Karl  – “Are You Lost Out of Darkness?” from “Stabat Mater” (2008)

Anon. Religious Easter song from Provence – Lei planchs de nostra-Dama

Ivanoff, Vladimir  – The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach (USA Premiere broadcasts)

Poleva, Victoria – “David’s Psalm 50” (2001)

Von Bingen, Hildegard – O Splendissima gemma

Machajdik, Peter – Namah (2000)

Fanshawe, David – Crucifixus: Rain Song from “African Sanctus”

04/07/2009

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski) – Genevan Psalter, Psalm 6

Binder, Abraham Wolf – Two Hassidic Moods

Escobar, Pedro de – Stabat mater

Rahbari, Alexander – Persian Mysticism around G

Alfonso X el Sabio – Cantiga #292

Handel-Gallus, Jacobus – Lamentation 1

Horvit, Michael – Aleinu (Adoration) for Violin, Baritone, Choir and Organ

Williams, Julius- Meditation from the Easter Celebration

La Rue, Pierre de – Lesson 1 from Lamentations of Jeremiah

Waclaw of Szamotul – Psalm 85

Muzafar (17th Century Turkish court) – Bashraf zenjir husseyni

Caceres, Avraham – Cantata Le El Elim (To the God of Gods)

Gubrou, Tsegue Maryam – Golgotha

Al-Ansari, Ali Zakaria – Tranquil Moment

Pamintuan, John August – Crucifixus

Attributed to Emperor Leo the 6th – Hymn to the Virgin at the Foot of the Cross

Warshauer, Meira – Bracha

Lukaszewski, Pawel – Recordationes de Christo moriendo for Soprano and Strings

Ben-Amots, Ofer- Psalm 137

Arcadelt, Jacob – Lamentations

Sidiq, Mohammad Othman – Memoirs

 

Why must we categorize music?

I do not like dividing music into categories.  I do not even like the term classical music.  Music is music and good music is good music!

Through the centuries in every part of the world music was created for religious, spiritual, and personal needs and most importantly for fun, joy and entertainment.  Music is a magical International language, which can be understood by all.  We should try to understand and embrace music from every source and culture. Our Western European classical music is only a small part of that equation.  India has classical music too, as well  many other countries.

We can find much similarity between past and present. Michael Praetorius was a Rock and Roller of his time. Magic Flute was a Broadway Musical. Chopin and Bartok were inspired by folk music and Gregorian Chant could be considered New Age music. There is a great similarity between Bach’s music and jazz, etc.  So, why do we have a problem with the music of our time?

Unfortunately, classical music (in its traditional form) has become music for a small aging élite, with no connection to a wider audience.   This is not what composers would want.

Since music education in the schools is generally almost non-existent it has become very difficult inspire a younger audience to listen to the traditional masterworks of the great composers such as Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven, etc.  Even students who study music privately generally only know the repertoire they are learning on their instrument.  How sad!

I feel that the music of our time is music that young people can relate to and can close the gap between various groups that are intimidated by classical music.   With our increasing population we should have more listeners enjoying the music of our time on the radio and concert halls.  The students in my Music History classes are exposed regularly to new music and they love it.  Many old forms that are found centuries ago can be found in today’s recent music.  In teaching the Concerto Grosso in my Baroque History classes for example I always find it valuable to see how the form is used in the music of our time as well.  After listening to a Concerto Grosso of Corelli, why not listen to a Concerto Grosso of Schnittke for example?  We need to make the experience of Classical music relevant to the experience of our younger students.

It is indeed very sad but many classical stations and orchestras have closed their door forever in recent years. I am really not interested to quote any numbers because this is not important. The fact is that they are closing.

Meanwhile booming New Music scenes in a few big cities around the USA are proving that new music attracts younger people.  Unfortunately all of this excitement is confined to a few cities and to a selected group of people.  We are also lucky now that we have many excellent new music Internet radio programs and stations, but they are confined to the Internet and technologically oriented listeners. This takes out of circulation a whole group of people and sentences them to listening to the warhorses and Muzak.

A sad excuse for continuing stale programming for classical radio is saying that according to the polls: “this is what listeners want.”

From my personal experience, the pollsters are professional statisticians, and often they do not know what questions to ask.  They also tend to bend questions to fit needs and expectation.  They should stick to calculating how many pair of shoes one person can produce in one hour, not how many Mozart’s you should listen to at breakfast and within 12 hours and how many Brahms pieces you should listen to at dinnertime.

How do listeners know what they want if they never heard anything else except what is played on their radio station?  This is like saying “I love bananas (Mozart) and strawberry (Schubert) for breakfast but I hate pomegranates and kiwis (new unknown music).” Did you ever try any out? “No, I never tasted them because they are too exotic for me.”

I get mad when I hear people saying that obscure music is obscure for a reason. Yes there is a reason, but not always because the music is bad. It is because no one takes the time to listen. Why take time? Let us play something that was tested 100 times at 100 stations each day.

Even a professional musician like myself, gets tired of listening to same old stuff and wants change. In fact, I do not attend concerts that have just standard repertoire. I rather listen to one of my CD’s.  Most radio programs are so predictable that it does not make any difference to me which station I tune to. To put it mildly, they are boring!!!  So many stations lack vision and do not look to the future. How sad!!!!

A few years ago I had the opportunity to meet my radio hero, Jim Nettleton who was a rock and roll DJ and had a 50-year career.

He inspired me for many years, and was an incredibly personable man.  I met him few times before his early death of lung cancer at the age of only 69.  I felt I knew him for many years just after talking to him for just 1 minute at our first meeting.  I always think about him before beginning my radio show.  Of course we talked a great deal about radio and he said something that will always stay with me.  Hi said; “Unpredictability is entertainment.” How true this is in everything we do!!!

Please do not take me wrong. I still do love and have respect for Beethoven, Brahms, and countless others, and I remember growing up and being excited about so many works, but I am tired of listening to same works  over and over again.

I do not advocate not playing those composers. I just feel that we should have a good balance of all periods with a major focus on new music from the end of the 20th and the 21st century.  I would rather spend my energy on exposing living composers and little known music of other periods.

We are the only society that lives in the past and considers works written 80 years ago as a new 20th century work. Yes, it was a new work 80 years ago and guess what, it was most likely performed then. The time line for new music froze in 1943, when Rachmaninoff died.

Unfortunately, this applies not only to radio and the concert halls, but also to many institutions teaching future musicians. Just this last statement would take up a whole new blog.  Each century cherished it’s new music and older music was confined to libraries.

I chuckle when I try to imagine how music would develop if our ancestors in earlier centuries would treat new music like we do now. Composers would have to find other jobs, like cleaning barns full of cow manure, working as smiths, or working as horse carriage drivers.  Who would need new music if only Gregorian chants would be required in churches and at official ceremonies at the times of Bach and Handel.  For fun, everyone would dance to the tunes of the pilgrim songs from the “Llibre Vermell de Montserrat”. Hmm, Bach in Gregorian mode? Can you imagine Bach’s Gregorian St John Passion and what about a Gregorian Coronation Mass and a Gregorian Messiah?

It might be funny to imagine, but I am very sad………Do to the variety of music being written today, there is music for everyone from literally all over the world.  I feel  that because of this we are living in one of music’s most exciting times.  Unfortunately, most people who are in the position to help spread the word don’t do so.It is time that we give more support to all of our living composers from all over the world and New Music!!!!

More about me

About me – continues

So what is so special about the radio and me?

I do not know? Maybe the fact that after 14 years I am still passionate about what I do. Luckily my wonderful wife, Beata, supports what I do. On our first date instead of ordering dinner we talked about Hovhaness, Penderecki, Bacewicz and the Górecki Third Symphony, which was little known here in the west then. I think I impressed her with my knowledge of Polish music!! I remember she also loved the way I played Chopin! I think I melted her heart at the time since she is very fussy about the interpretation of Chopin!

You must be thinking that I am crazy to do all this work as a volunteer. I am crazy and enjoy every moment of it.  I am also excited that I am in the position to share all the obscure works I air with my listening audience.

From the beginning, whether it was early or new music, I always wanted the listening audience to hear something that other radio stations were not playing.

Yes, I am very lucky that my radio station does not impose any guidelines and programming restrictions, otherwise it would not be possible to develop my program the way it is, and prove to the world that listeners are ready for change.

So far, I have broken every rule governing traditional classical music programming with the exception (to the point), of the more difficult modern music, which I never program during drive time but after 11:00am.

And yes, some might think that I do have rather unorthodox ideas regarding classical programming, but every one of my programs is well thought out and unique and has to my knowledge never offended anyone.

Oh no, I lied, on my first WPRB program I played the Rossini Cat Duet without announcing it and some lady called, yelling at me. She told me that everyone at WPRB was off the deep end or something to that effect.  I politely thanked her for her call, with the wild satisfaction of waiting to announce the composer. I would have loved to see her face at that moment. I also had a listener that I considered to be a stalker. He called me often and criticized my work all the time. I was wondering why he was listening, but now after all this time I actually might know why.

I always want to prove to the world that there is so much wonderful new music fitting every discriminating taste in our century. To illustrate this I presented my 1st annual program devoted to music of 21st century on January 1, 2003.

In addition, I have presented 4, 24 hour Marathons of new music. I have presented hundreds of $0 budget special programs focusing on various countries and regions as well as variety of programs on different subjects. I have presented programs on Young Composers (age 30 and below) and women composers. I have had over 60 guests, presented many Voyages Around The World and early music specials, etc.  All of these are posted on my website, where I have a page which lists all the special programs.

In addition to the programs I have created already, my head is still full of ideas about programs that I never will be able to share due to the lack of time. With all the new music coming from all over the world something must give.

 

I have presented many world and American première broadcasts. My listeners have known Peteris Vasks and Paweł Łukaszewski long before they hit the NY radio waves and yes, Grażyna Bacewicz was on my first program 14 years ago.

I do not believe in occasional tokens in between the warhorses. I do not believe that you only can play certain types of music during drive time (no choral music) etc.

My listeners come from all social and age groups from college professors to tractor-trailer drivers. I am always trying to prove that there is music for everyone!

I have found out that once a listener develops trust in you, they would be willing to give anything a chance. My listeners have told me that because of my program they now attend concerts of new music.  With today’s CD prices, no one will buy music that they never heard before.

I know for a fact that many listeners have purchased CDs they have heard on my program and composers have gotten commissions for new works, after someone heard their music on my show.Yes, this is music to my ears.

I do not claim that every work written today is good. I do not claim that the music I present is or will be considered a masterpiece in the future.

Based on the past experience it would be arrogant of me to do that.

The music that I share with my listeners must have some value for me and bring me joy. I must like it or find it interesting.

Only the future will tell if the various works I play from the end of the 20th or 21st centuries will someday be considered great, stipulating that we have a 22nd century and our planet survives mistreatment, abuse and rape.

 

 

 

%d bloggers like this: