It is time once again for the New Music Marathon “Viva 21st Century”

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2018 Marathon – with composer Robert Moran

It has been already eight years since I wrote the last extensive blog titled Viva 21st Century Music, which explains the beginning of my obsession with this grueling event that lasts between 24-26 hours each year-end. I thought it would be fun to share some marathon numbers.
I must confess that I am a marathon junky and wonder why I devote a large portion of my winter break preparing and presenting this big event. However, when I hear wonderful new work the first thing that comes to my mind is “wow, this would be great for my marathon.” I get a new box and start adding CD’s to the marathon pending file.

Instead of celebrating the holidays I march into the WPRB studio with boxes of CDs, valises of fresh clothing, a container of mixed nuts, a couple gallons of water and green tea. There is a couch in the WPRB studio and I make a point not to look at it for obvious reasons during the event.

I have not kept detailed marathon stats for years before 2018, but here are some figures that were easy to put together.Voila_Capture 2019-12-16_15-05-53_.png

Now, it is easy to figure out why friends call me MarathonO-Maniac. Voila_Capture 2019-12-16_16-21-13_

I am lucky that WPRB has given me the opportunity for almost 23 years to do radio programming I believe in. Classical Discoveries would not be allowed to exist as it is on any corporate run radio station.

 

Here is a break down of some statistics from last year 2018 marathon,  excluding and including January programs plus complete event participating composers (below)

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More exciting new music is coming up!! Here is the Viva 21st Century schedule. Hope you can join me this year. A majority of the works on the marathon will include complete and from the last 10 years works.

More exciting new music is coming up!! ‬Here is the Viva 21st Century schedule:

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A majority of the works on the marathon will include complete and from the last 10 years works.

Hope you can join me this year: on 103.3FM Princeton NJ., and around the world @  http://www.wprb.com

 

 

 

 

 

Musical Tidings for the Holiday

Many things have changed since my last blog devoted to the 15th annual series “In Praise of Woman”– one and a half years ago. Since I have a full time job, some private teaching and radio, I do not have much time left for other things.

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I would like to bring to your attention a number of special annual holiday programs listed on my website and to the Holiday line-up on Facebook.

Already aired part 1 of the Christmas Trilogy Christmas Around the World.

 

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  • This Friday’s special broadcast is titled Christmas in America (6:00-9:00am)
  • Next week 2 broadcasts titled “A Medieval, Renaissance & Baroque Christmas” will be presented. (Wednesday, Dec. 18, 5:00-11:00am and Friday, Dec. 20, 5:00-9:00am)
  • On Friday, December 27, I will air music of black composers in observance of Kwanzaa
  • On Saturday, December 28 at 2:00 pm, the fifteenth 24-hour Marathon & fourteenth titled “Viva 21st Century” will begin. For the second consecutive year, the marathon will be equally divided between men and women composers. (Details are in next blog I am working on, so stay tuned!!!)
  • New Year’s Morning, Wednesday, Jan. 01, the 23rd annual program “Shall We Dance” will be presented.

I have also decided that it is time to give my website a facelift and will begin this project shortly after January 1st. I am looking forward to getting involved with this.

For those who are not familiar with my program here are a couple of things you should know:

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Classical Discoveries began in May of 1997 on WPRB (a member-supported station with students and community volunteers like myself).

The excitement of preparing weekly programs and playing music rarely presented on the radio, while supporting living composers has kept me on the air for the last 23 years.

I maintain my website, and purchase many recordings with my own funds. The only one time I ask for money is during the station fund drives since WPRB is member supported.

I do not need to prove my commitment to presenting women & living composers and music from countries that rarely get exposure on the airwaves.

I have presented many specials, annual programs, like “In Praise of Woman”, Marathons, including a whole Marathon devoted to women composers in 2008 (long before anyone else devoted large blocks of time to the music of women).

If you check my playlists you will see that my programs are always diversified, and almost always include women composers from around the world, even during the early years of this program when women were largely ignored in general.

I almost never include music from the Romantic and Classical periods (with occasional digressions during special programs) for the simple reason. These two periods are featured regularly on other radio stations. I would rather focus on really neglected music written before 1750, and after 1950.

You can check my two first blogs: Finally, I am here and More about me

Last year brought some positive changes in the focus on works of women composers thanks to the incredible project from The Institute for Composer Diversity,  the brainchild of composer Rob Deemer of Fredonia, State University of New York.

This project started with just a database of women composers from all over the world but became much more – an incredible resource for anyone who wishes to expand their knowledge of women composers and their works. This project also brought attention to the minimal programming of women composers on concert programs and radio broadcasts.

This shamed some orchestras for excluding women to the point that they adjusted their programs.

We are also seeing more women played on some radio stations. Unfortunately, most stations focus more on 19th century and early 20th century music (same like male counterparts). It seems that many are afraid of new music and often treat new music as a token.

I am very happy that in recent times it is much easier to obtain recordings of music by women composers which was much more difficult during my initial years on the air.

In conclusion, I want to take this opportunity to thank you all for your many kind words over the years about Classical Discoveries. Your comments keep me going week after week after week.

I wish you all a Happy Holiday Season.

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Stay tuned. More new music is coming up!

 

 

 

Classical Discoveries – 20 Years On The Air on WPRB

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In 1999, 2 years after Classical Discoveries was born I got my own e-mail address on CompuServe.

One of the first listeners contacting me was Linda Holt, which is why I was very excited when she wrote a wonderful post for Philadelphia’s “Broad Street Review”, a bit shorter version of the blog below.

I intended to write this post myself, but considering Linda’s long connection to this program her personal sharing was a great way to commemorate 20 years of Classical Discoveries.

She is the author of The Black Spaniard, a novel about young Beethoven, that she is obsessed with (and yes, the other book is coming soon). She teaches Humanities at Southern New Hampshire University and Thomas Edison State University. Her classical music reviews have appeared in newspapers and online and of course she is one of the long, faithful listeners of Classical Discoveries.

I am adding a few of my comments to this blog since it is focuses on 20 years and many things did happen  during this time.

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Marvin Rosen’s Classical Discoveries celebrates

20 years bringing new music to audiences around the world

by Linda Holt

Twenty years ago, Bill Clinton was sworn in to his second term as President, The English Patient won the best picture Oscar, and Scottish scientists cloned Dolly the Sheep.

But the big news for music lovers was the debut on May 29, 1997, of one of the most unique programs in the international radio community: Classical Discoveries, created, produced, and hosted by Marvin Rosen. Broadcast online and on WPRB 103.3 FM (Princeton University’s independent radio station), Classical Discoveries has no match as a source of seldom-heard music, exciting interviews, and playlists designed to wake up brains stuck in a 19th century groove.

Where else can a listener hear music composed by the daughter of Lucrezia Borgia, a five-hour program dedicated to the art music of Native Americans, the art of Klezmer, music for Kwanzaa, and melodic masterworks from Poland and Estonia? A tune played on an Australian didgeridoo may follow an air composed by King Henry VIII. The program airs each Wednesday from 5:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., with special broadcasts throughout the year. This spring, for example, Marvin’s series, Treasures of Early Music, is broadcast from 5:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Mondays.

“I still have my first playlist,” admitted Marvin recently, with his unflagging enthusiasm for his favorite subject. “It is handwritten, since we didn’t go online until 2001.” While there were works by Bach, Mozart, and Scarlatti on that program, there were also signs of things to come. Marvin featured works by Glass, Yardumian, and even concluded with Lennon-McCartney’s “Eleanor Rigby.”

Two first playlists

Two first playlists

Today attracting diverse audiences including young and old listeners, Classical Discoveries found its niche by November of 1997, responding to listeners who were pleasantly startled to hear new music that unexpectedly met every standard for beauty and interest. Marvin even expanded the definition of new music to include unfamiliar or underplayed compositions, such as selections from the earliest years of the Middle Ages, (forgotten contemporaries of famous Western composers), music from countries and ethnic traditions not well known in Western classical circles, and music by women composers. While not taking any political position, the program also has focused thematically on topics of current interest, such as a recent program devoted to musical depictions of water.

“One of the unexplored areas of women’s music is the work composed by nuns over the centuries,” Marvin observed.

A glance of the program’s playlists, appealingly displayed online with easy-to-access links, reveals some of the variety that listeners can find nowhere else. In recent years, these have included Music of Asia, the annual In Praise of Woman series, Tulpe: a Native American Indians Tribute, Sacred Bridges linking spirituality in music across traditions, Return to Estonia, and Water is Life-For Flint.

Editor’s note: Attached to this article are several of Classical Discoveries’ playlists that show the diversity and originality of the program content.

Impact on listeners and composers

In addition to its impact on listeners, Classical Discoveries provides active composers with a forum to play and explain their works.

“What would we composer do without Marvin Rosen and his amazing show?” asks Robert Moran, a Philadelphia-based composer whose work ranging from chamber music to opera is recognized around the globe. “He presents the most varied of radio events, always exciting and always an adventure.” Moran has appeared in person several times on Classical Discoveries.

Composer Andrew Rudin, heralded by one critical journal as “the grand old man of new music,” agrees. “Marvin Rosen has been uniquely important to living composers of the greater Philadelphia area,” he wrote recently, “not only because he plays our music, but he also invites us into his studio as on-air guests. And in addition, he educates us as well, with his extraordinary knowledge and curiosity about music of living composers in even the most obscure corners of our planet, and in the most marginalized communities. His perceptions, taste, and explorations represent a personal passion that greatly enriches our musical community.”

A labor of love

In addition to teaching full-time at Westminster Conservatory in Princeton, Marvin gets up at 3:30 a.m. to host Classical Discoveries, but he is not alone. His wife, Beata Rzeszodko-Rosen, who shares his musical tastes, is by his side at WPRB’s music studios in Bloomberg Hall on the university campus, creating exquisitely detailed and content-rich playlists and other Web resources for everyone from the musically curious to scholars and researchers of early and new music.

“Beata has been with me right from the start,” beamed Marvin in a recent interview. “She is the person behind the scenes making Classical Discoveries possible.”

The couple even met over an incident involving new music. Beata had gone to the Princeton University Store (where Marvin managed the record department) in search of music by Alan Hovhaness. It just so happened that Marvin’s doctoral dissertation from Teachers College, Columbia University, was on the music of Hovhaness. The two enthusiasts bonded over the Armenian-influenced American composer’s intensely melodic compositions and before long they were married and had the opportunity to meet the composer in person before he passed in 2000.

Another major influence on Marvin’s musical life comes from an unexpected corner of the musical world. “If there is one person whose professionalism most influenced me it’s Jim Nettleton,” he said. “Jim was an ‘oldies’ DJ at WFIL in Philadelphia when I was young. He told me that the most important lesson for broadcasters was to remember that in radio, unpredictability means entertainment. That’s advice I’ve taken to heart over the years.”

Going the distance with new music marathons

Classical Discoveries is also the only new and unfamiliar music program with an annual marathon. Instead of running 26 miles as in the athletic prototype, Marvin hosts a non-stop edition of Classical Discoveries at the end of the year, logging 24 to 25 hours of air time, and taking catnaps on the couch on a catch-as-catch-can basis.

The marathon theme is “Viva 21st century,” with a focus on music composed since 2000. The theme was first explored on the show in 2003, and by 2007 had morphed into the marathon framework. Since then, there have been a dozen marathons, with sub-themes of International Music, American Music, and Music by Women Composers. Two marathons with special themes focused on post-9-11 music and the 100th anniversary of the birth of Alan Hovhaness.

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New music: its time has come

“After World War II, there was a lot of new music that was heavy and difficult for many people to listen to,” Marvin reflected. “Now that has changed. Much of the new music being composed is accessible and can be enjoyed by a wide audience. Think back to the time of Bach and Beethoven: new music is what was being played. The secret is to start out playing some new works that are pleasant for most people to hear, then you can follow up with music that is a little more challenging and build on that.”

Marvin will incorporate elements from the best of Classical Discoveries on his 20th anniversary program 5:00 a.m. to 11 a.m. May 29. Expect to hear the Vivaldi sinfonia (original disk used in 1997) that opened the first program in the series, followed by other works played on the first program as well as some of the most favorite compositions of listeners over the years. “And there will be surprises,” added Marvin, who is looking forward to 20 more years of innovative programming. “It wouldn’t be Classical Discoveries without surprises!”

–Linda Holt

Almost 12 years ago, in early October 2005, I found out that Classical Discoveries was the recipient of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Radio Broadcast Award.

Here are a couple of pictures taken at the December ceremony!! It was an exciting time for me and was totally unexpected.

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Here are some photos of guests who visited the WPRB studio during the last 20 years: Maya Beiser, Martha Mooke, Marilyn Bliss and Rain Worthington, Katherine Hoover Jennifer Higdon, Jakub Ciupiński, Halim El-Dabh, Danny Dorff, Andrew Rudin, Alexandra Vrebalov, Alex Shapiro, Vivian FungSergio Cervetti, Robert Moran, Randall Woolf and Kathleen Supové, Philip Blackburn and DBRPaul Mealor,

At the end of last year, I was the host of a performance of Bach’s Christmas Oratorio as presented by Choral Arts Philadelphia. Here is a small introduction to the event.

 

 

Here is a list of some other publication honoring 20th anniversary of Classical Discoveries:

May 05, 2017 – Radio SurvivorHAPPY 20TH BIRTHDAY TO CLASSICAL DISCOVERIES – by Matthew Lasar

May 10, 2017 –Town Topics of Princeton NJ20 YEARS OF CLASSICAL DISCOVERIES WITH MARVIN ROSEN ON WPRBby Doug Wallack

May 13, 2017 – Broad Street ReviewTWO DECADES OF DISCOVERIESby Linda Holt

You can follow me on:

Facebook, Twitter, in addition you can join the Classical Discoveries Facebook Group

Marvin Rosen

Little Known Treasures of Early Music for Easter

kiehrI just finished my special, very private holiday dinner and was sitting at my desk sifting through the CD’s  for this Easter Sunday, April  05 , 2014 – from 10:00am – 1:00pm –  early music special on WPRB, 103.3FM, Princeton, NJ

One of my favorite activity is listening to all the moving and beautiful lesser known works and sharing them with listeners on my weekly and occasional special programs.

Yes, this Easter Sunday is special and Jeannie, host of Sunday Jazz is taking a break to spend time with her family. As before, I will devote this time to music for Easter and to the days preceding it.

If you never listened  to my early music programs you will find out that the most works are a bit off the beaten track. You will not find here J.S. Bach, Vivaldi or Handel even though I love all of them.

Some of the works you will hear have interesting stories behind them, for example the totally forgotten Miserere of Tommaso Bai which was paired with the famous Allegri work during his lifetime.

To give you some idea, here is a list of some of the works which will be presented in “Little Known Treasures of Early Music for Easter”
Missa Resurrectionis by Italian composer, Antonio Bertali (1605-1669)
Missa Resurructio Christi by Italian composer, Andrea Rota (1593-1597)

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Missa Crux Fidelis by Spanish composer, Sebastian de Vivanco (c.1551-1622)
Miserere in C minor by Czech composer, Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745)

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Miserere  by Italian composer, Tommaso Bai (16501714 )

Stabat Mater by English composer, John Browne (fl. ca. 1490)
Miserere
by Italian composer, Gaetano Veneziano  (1656-1716)
and more

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Classical Discoveries airs each Wednesday on WPRB at 103.3 FM Princeton or on-line at www.wprb.com

If you cannot listen the day of the broadcast,  you can listen to the archives for over two weeks after each show at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/index_music.html

and yes, next Sunday from 1:00 till 3:00pm I will be presenting another special: MUSIC FOR ORTHODOX EASTER

 

Sacred Bridges – 2015

It is the time of the year (during the time of the important Jewish and Christian holidays) when I present my  program Sacred Bridges. The focus of this program however is on spiritual music from multiple religious traditions and not just the two. From the end of March until the end of May, many religious denominations celebrate holidays. Sacred Bridges represents religious tolerance and interfaith interaction through music.

Composer Obadiah the Proselyte (ca. 1070) a Catholic priest, who converted to Judaism

Wojciech Bobowski known as Ali Ufki was born in Poland. Composed an Ottoman Psalter, based on the Genevan metrical psalter, and was considered one of the most important 17th-century figures in Ottoman music.

Ali Ufki /Genevan Psalter: Psalm 8

Here is a list of some of the works that I will  present in this year’s special:
De Profundis by Polish composer, Marian Borkowski (1934- )
Seven Last Words by American composer, Bern Herbolsheimer (1948- )
Complete Psalm XVIII, “I cieli immensi narrano” from Estro poetico-armonico by Italian composer, Benedetto Marcello (1686-1739) – my favorite recording with Coro e Orchestra della Radiotelevisione della Svizzera Italiana with Edwin Loehrer conducting

 Benedetto Marcello used Hebrew melodies in his Estro poetico-armonico

Stabat Mater by Welsh composer, Paul Mealor (1975- )
Mizrach
by Israeli composer, Betty Olivero (1954- )
Toward the Night
by Japanese composer, Somei Satoh (1947- )

Passion Week (complete) by Russian composer, Maximilian Steinberg (1883-1946) – The last major sacred work composed in Russia after the imposition of Communism in its World Premiere Recording by the highly acclaimed Cappella Romana

Jewish/Lithuanian born Maximilian Steinberg joined the Eastern Orthodox Church upon his marriage to Rimsky-Korsakov’s daughter

plus music by: Jean Colin, Alan Hovhaness, Mehmet Ali Sanlikol, Valentin Silvestrov, and many others

Classical Discoveries airs each Wednesday on WPRB at 103.3 FM Princeton or on-line at www.wprb.com

If you cannot listen the day of the broadcast,  you can listen to the archives for over two weeks after each show at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/index_music.html

Those Magnificent Philadelphians!

You might think that the above title is referring to the famous Leopold Stokowski, Eugene Ormandy, Samuel Barber, or even Vincent Persichetti, but anyone who knows me would know that would not be totally the case. I am not trying to be disrespectful to them of course, but I’d rather focus on what is happening in Philadelphia now. We have many great musicians, composers and artists living and associated with the City of Brotherly Love.

Over the years some of them have visited the WPRB studio including Andrea Clearfield, George Crumb, Daniel Dorff, James Freeman, Jennifer Higdon and of course Alan Harler and Robert Moran, who are returning for a visit together this Wednesday, October 3  from 10:00am till 1:00pm for what promises to be an exciting 3 hours of programming!!  

Robert Moran at WPRB Studio during his 2011 interview

On the venue will be a discussion of the October 21, 2012 world premiere performance of Robert Moran’s Angus Dei and the commissioned, full-chorus version of the ethereal Trinity Requiem, with the Philadelphia Boys Choir and The Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, as well as of course other subjects related to music.

 

Alan Harler has been artistic director of the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia from 1988 and is only the 12th person to hold that position since the chorus’s founding in 1874.


He is an exceptional conductor with a global reach and is a strong supporter of new American music. During his tenure with the Mendelssohn Club, he has commissioned 48 new compositions. Yes, a man close to my heart.  I have attended many of their concerts for the last 15 years and was never disappointed. This will be Alan’s second visit to the WPRB studio.


Robert Moran is an American composer of operas and ballets as well as many orchestral, vocal, chamber and dance works.  He has been a “Classical Discoveries” guest several times over the years.

The Trinity Requiem issued on the Innova Label received the world premiere broadcast on Classical Discoveries in August, 2011 with a repeat broadcast during the 24-hour 9/11 Marathon.

This wonderful CD together with Moran’s 3 others issued on the Innova label as well as the Mendelssohn Club CD with music of Higdon, Clearfield and Primosh (also on Innova) will be offered as special premiums only on Wednesday, October 10 between 5:00am and 1:00pm during the special Fund Drive Edition of my program.

In a few days I will post more details about the Fund Drive and will also provide a  link to the list of special premiums offered only during the program.

Classical Discoveries airs each Wednesday on WPRB at 103.3 FM Princeton or on-line at www.wprb.com

If you cannot listen that day you have the option to record program via DAR.fm   (custom link:DAR.fm/classicaldiscoveries(wprb), or listen to the archives for over two weeks after each show at: http://www.classicaldiscoveries.org/index_music.html

Robert Moran (*1937): Requiem: Chant du Cygne, for 4 Choruses and 4 Chamber Ensembles (1990).

Artistic Director Alan Harler Describes Andrea Clearfield’s World Premiere

The Kitten, Venti Dita and the Music!

It is  hard to imagine that there will be no more occasional sitting in front of the TV or enjoying the sounds of the garden in the evening with Beata and a glass of wine. Yes, I am going back to teaching this Monday.  I am sad about the passing of summer but am also exited about the new school year, especially that this year I will be teaching four classes of my favorite subject – music history. I am also looking forward to my upcoming recital and new CD of piano duos.

I did not do much of what I planned at all. I had no time for blogs, catching up with Facebook friends or extra trips to New York and the Amish County. My summer was devoted though to plenty of piano music and cats, two of my favorite subjects.

The Kitten!

On my last day of school we become  parents to a little, scroungy looking black kitten with white spots, who if would not be found by students in a Princeton University dumpster, would be crushed to death.

Pix day one

Now, after 3 months and dozens of sleepless nights, many broken flowerpots, chewed up hibiscus, 2 planters that became kitty litter boxes and dozens more emergency cleanups, our little kitten Pix, is taller and heavier than our biggest cat, Puszek. He provides us with joy and constant entertainment as well as a means for exercise for our other three other kitties that were sleeping over 20 hours a day.

Venti Dita!

Finally, after working for almost two years together with Jennifer, we came up with the name for our piano duo: Venti Dita. I think that this is a really cool, simple musical name – 20 fingers in Italian.

The biggest achievement and time-consuming activity this summer was the recording of our first duo CD devoted to contemporary music for piano 4 hands, at Purchase College, Purchase, NY.

When my wife commuted to work in Willow Grove in Pa. I always teased her that she picked the very early starting time of 5:30am to get good parking and to avoid traffic on the PA turnpike. The karma caught with me this summer when after my first trip to Purchase, I was almost late to our first recording session, despite the fact I left more than enough time.

Now it was her time for her to get back at me and remind me of the old times. After that first week I would leave home at 5am to pass the George Washington Bridge before it turned into a parking lot. My extra time would spent in a Diner having a hearty breakfast with Jennifer and yes, sipping good tea, especially since we would take only a short break for lunch that Beata packed for us in a small cooler so we would not waste time driving to another diner. Coming back home was also tied up to traffic patterns. Having dinner before leaving Westchester solved this problem and most times I had a smooth trip home.

I feel sorry for drivers that must put up with this kind of aggravation on the road every day. For last 15 years I take a train instead of drive to New York.

I am very lucky to live very close to my school as well as to WPRB, since the traffic around Princeton is not much better, especially now when NJDOT closed a few local roads, creating havoc for local drivers.

We had 3 recording sessions plus 3 sessions with our wonderful engineer, Andy Cardenas.  One recording session was extremely exhausting since we could  not use the air conditioner and the temperature outside soared to  98 degrees.

Yea!!!! We have a gold master and it sounds really great, but we still have many steps to take care before the CD can be released. Hopefully the recording will be out before the end of the year.  Cannot wait!!!

The Music!

Each year I devote much time in the summer to listen to music, but this summer I spent more time at the piano.

Besides hosting my both radio programs at WPRB, and yes, celebrating at the end of May the beginning of my 16th year on the air, I spent my summer preparing for the recording sessions as well as my upcoming piano recital devoted to contemporary music.

On the radio I presented a few special Early Music Editions, hosted a jazz program with music by classical composers inspired by jazz, and had a few guests such as the young Serbian composer-violinist Ana Milosavljević, Australian composer and conductor Sean O’Boye, Elliott Carter expert Joe Barron, and pianist Rosanne Vita Nahass who recently released a CD featuring the Concord, Piano Sonata No. 2, Concord, Mass.  by Charles Ives. Finally, I celebrated John Cage’s 100th Birthday with an unexpected 6-hour edition of “Classical Discoveries Goes Avant-Garde”.

My piano recital titled “Contemporary Piano Miniatures”, will be Sunday afternoon, September 23 at 3:00pm in Bristol Chapel at Westminster Choir College of Rider University and will include music from many countries. I will be joined in several works by my piano duo partner Jennifer Castellano, and will perform selections included on our upcoming CD.

And yes, this concert is FREE!!!!  So if you are around, please join me and if you are afraid of new music, here is your opportunity to try without risk. Princeton is a charming town in  early autumn.

If you listen to “Classical Discoveries” you will recognize the names of many composers. In addition, you will hear a complete performance of the work by my duo partner Jennifer I use as my opening theme.

I feel very lucky that I am in position as an educator, performer and radio host to expose new and unknown music to many.

Before I conclude, I would just like to remind you all that we must support our living composers today as they were supported by their contemporaries in earlier centuries.

If you want directions or more information please email me at Marvinarosen@gmail.com

If you are on Facebook and attend please sign the guest list at: https://www.facebook.com/events/438945242823380/

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