Sacred Bridges

I love all kinds of holidays, civic and religious. Somehow this is one of few things in today’s world that reminds me who I am and from where I came from.

Maybe the fact that I am Jewish and married to a Catholic woman makes my thinking easier. One thing I have learnt from my relationship is that except for some different traditions we are very sentimental about, there is not much difference between our beliefs.

I rather call myself an open-minded spiritual man that is always searching for the similarity between religions rather than differences. I apply these similar feelings to all kinds of music. For example, I do not see a Renaissance mass as religious church music even if it was created for a church, but rather as a spiritual expression of the composer.

The concept of Sacred Bridges was rather accidental. No question that the Cd titled “Sacred Bridges” with the Kings Singers and Sarband was an inspiration, as well as my favorite monarch in medieval history – the 13th century king Alfonso the X called El Sabio.

Since the Christian and Jewish Holidays are often celebrated close to each other I was faced with the dilemma as to which holiday I should give my attention. The annual March series “In Praise of Woman” made the situation worse since the holidays often fall in March. For sometime now, additional show times are, in addition, not available for these special programs on WPRB.  The concept of the program celebrating the spiritual music of many religions was born three years ago.

Last year the main features of the program was  “The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach” by Vladimir  Ivanoff.  This year the beautiful “Messe de Requiem” by the little known French Composer, Alfred Desenclos (1912-1971) will be included.  This little known work was a victim of plagiarism, which you can read about by clicking the link below.

http://www.requiemsurvey.org/composers.php?id=256


For idea what you can expect if you tune into this program see prior programs:

03/30/2010

Alfonso X, El Sabio – Cantiga No. 76

Massaino, Tirburtio – Lamentations of Jeremiah the Prophet

King David – Song of Exile, Psalm 137, Verses 1 thru 6  Anon.

Devotional Sufi Song  – “Ya Hou Ya man Hou”

Caceres, Avraham  -“Hiski Hizki”

Harrison, Lou – Easter Cantata

Wronowicz, Maciej – De Profundis

Hersant, Philippe   – Le Chemin de Jerusalem (2003)

Hovhaness, Alan  – Shepherd of Israel (Last Section)

Hovhaness, Alan – Jesus Christ is Risen Today, Op. 100, No. 3b (from Easter Cantata)

Marcello, Benedetto  – Psalm X “In te Domino confido”

Anonymous Middle Ages  – Gregorian Alleluia and improvization on sitar

Cohen, Egon – Stabat Mater (2006)

Anon. Sephardic – Morena me llaman

Nasco, Giovanni  – Lectio Prima: “Da lamentatione Hieremiae prophetae”

Satoh, Somei  – Homa

Skempton, Howard – How Sits this City” from Lamentations (2001)

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski)/Claude Goudimel – Psalm 5

Anon. Sephardic – Ea Judios

Silvestrov, Valentin – Psalm 150 from “Two Psalms of David” (2007)

Hamburg, Jeff – Psalm 29 and Psalm 150 from David – Five Psalms (1999)

Buddhist Chant, arr. Jean-Philippe Rykiel  – Hope for Enlightment

Avni, Tzvi  – Psalm 150 from “Mizmorei Tehillim”

Jenkins, Karl  – “Are You Lost Out of Darkness?” from “Stabat Mater” (2008)

Anon. Religious Easter song from Provence – Lei planchs de nostra-Dama

Ivanoff, Vladimir  – The Arabian Passion According to J.S. Bach (USA Premiere broadcasts)

Poleva, Victoria – “David’s Psalm 50” (2001)

Von Bingen, Hildegard – O Splendissima gemma

Machajdik, Peter – Namah (2000)

Fanshawe, David – Crucifixus: Rain Song from “African Sanctus”

04/07/2009

Ali Ufki (Wojciech Bobowski) – Genevan Psalter, Psalm 6

Binder, Abraham Wolf – Two Hassidic Moods

Escobar, Pedro de – Stabat mater

Rahbari, Alexander – Persian Mysticism around G

Alfonso X el Sabio – Cantiga #292

Handel-Gallus, Jacobus – Lamentation 1

Horvit, Michael – Aleinu (Adoration) for Violin, Baritone, Choir and Organ

Williams, Julius- Meditation from the Easter Celebration

La Rue, Pierre de – Lesson 1 from Lamentations of Jeremiah

Waclaw of Szamotul – Psalm 85

Muzafar (17th Century Turkish court) – Bashraf zenjir husseyni

Caceres, Avraham – Cantata Le El Elim (To the God of Gods)

Gubrou, Tsegue Maryam – Golgotha

Al-Ansari, Ali Zakaria – Tranquil Moment

Pamintuan, John August – Crucifixus

Attributed to Emperor Leo the 6th – Hymn to the Virgin at the Foot of the Cross

Warshauer, Meira – Bracha

Lukaszewski, Pawel – Recordationes de Christo moriendo for Soprano and Strings

Ben-Amots, Ofer- Psalm 137

Arcadelt, Jacob – Lamentations

Sidiq, Mohammad Othman – Memoirs

 

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About marvinrosen
Music is my middle name

3 Responses to Sacred Bridges

  1. Jennifer says:

    Great post Marvin. You and I share much of the same views on the topic of religion and music. Music is one of those things that is universal. Anyone can appreciate music no matter who they are, what religion they practice and what language they speak. My mother’s piano teacher always said that “Music is the language of Heaven that cannot be spoken in words.” This is why music brings people together.

  2. Pingback: Easter Idles « MarvinTheCat

  3. Philip E Miller says:

    Lovely posting, Marvin – You covered a topic dear to my dear in both depth and breadth. The “concept” of Sacred Bridge (also the title of a wonderful recording by the Boston Camerata) came from the magisterial tome by that same name by Eric Werner (1901-1988), published by Columbia University Press in 1959.

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